Encounter the intricate traditions of Japanese Funerals at NMFH

Japanese Funerals Exhibit at the National Museum of Funeral History | Photo courtesy of the National Museum of Funeral History

Step into Japan’s lavish and elaborate memorial ceremonies, the most expensive end-of-life commemorations in the world, at the Japanese Funerals exhibit inside the National Museum of Funeral History (NMFH) in North Houston.

Part of the museum’s diverse collection of permanent exhibits that explore history, science and culture, Japanese Funerals offers an uncommon glimpse into some of the Far East’s most fascinating customs around death.

Discover the most common method of treating the deceased, the formal gift-giving practices and the family’s unique ritual in handling a loved one’s cremated remains.

Also, in conjunction with the NMFH’s Historical Hearses exhibit, Japanese Funerals also features a uniquely and ornately designed 1972 Toyota Crown ceremonial hearse used in funeral services in Japan.

Learn more about the Japanese Funerals exhibit at the NMFH and explore the rest of the museum’s permanent collection.

More About the National Museum of Funeral History

Founded in 1992 and boasting America’s largest collection of authentic historical funeral service items in permanent exhibits, the National Museum of Funeral History (NMFH) is an exploration of history, science, and culture. 

Visitors can learn about hearses through history, caskets, and coffins, plus learn about the funerals of U.S. Presidents and Catholic Popes, celebrities, and the history of embalming and cremation, and more.

Open seven days a week, excluding major holidays, the museum is a testament to the cultural heritage of the funeral service industry and its time-honored tradition of compassion.

Explore and learn more about the National Museum of Funeral Historyplan your in-person visit, or take a virtual tour.

Japanese Funerals at the NMFH

Side view of the ornately designed 1972 Toyota Crown ceremonial | Photo courtesy of the National Museum of Funeral Historyhearse. |

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